Jim Esler – Meet the Aztecs

Codex Mendoza - Rank 3 Warrior with captive - Three Captive - Papalotl

Back in 2003 I was inspired by an article by Jim Esler called “Meet the Aztecs”. Jim offers an informed critique of the then WRG, primarily DBM and DBA, army lists for the Aztecs. Since then both DBM and Jim’s page has disappeared. I thought I’d pull Jim’s article back from the WayBackMachine and make it more easily accessible for the community. All words are Jim Esler’s; I have modified the formatting a tiny bit. Thanks to Ethan for finding the article.

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Balagan Data Sheets for Crossfire – Tank, APC, and Anti-tank Gun Stats

Crossfire Balagan Data Sheets Logo

Although my Crossfire data sheets have been around a while (since 2006), they never had a page of their own to explain why I wrote them. I thought I’d rectify the gap and take the opportunity to add some more vehicles.

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Map of Key Locations during the Rif War by Jesús Dapena

Rif Places - Jesus Dapena

Jesús Dapena shared his map of the key locations of the Rif War with me back in 2002. But the public has never seen it before. Since then Jesús has evolved the map further and now it is based on Google Maps. Map and words by Jesús.

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What is the Operational Level of War?

Three Levels of War - Strategic, Operational, Tactical

I’m interested in operational level wargames for World War II. But my definition of “operational level” has been pretty vague. Something about campaigns and major offensives. So I thought I’d explore operational level war in more detail … and it turns out I was right. It is all about campaigns and major offensives.

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Renault FT-17 and Schneider M16 CA1 Tanks in the Rif War

domin06 Schneider M16 CA1 Artillery tank about to descend from its carrier

In 2002, perhaps because Jesus Dapena had published some photos of Renault FT-17 tanks in the Rif, Santiago Dominguez sent Jesus some more photos of the Spanish FT-17s. But he also included photos of the more elusive Schneider M16 CA1 Tanks used by the Spanish in the Rif War. Jesus recently asked me to republish them.

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Renault FT-17 Tanks in the Rif War

Briz05 - FT-17 tanks for protection of the convoy to Tizzi-Asa - Cipriano Briz

Back in 2002 Jesus Dapena published some photos of Renault FT-17 Tanks in the Rif War; photos taken by Lieutenant Cipriano Briz (“Uncle Cipri”). I thought they were cool, got in contact with Jesus, and linked to his material from my Rif War pages (Timeline; Painting Guide; Sources; Orbat). Recently Jesus got in touch with me to explain that his site has now disappeared. Jesus kindly shared the content with me so I could republish them. All words and photos by Jesus.

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Crossfire Clarifications by Arty Confliffe from 2001

Crossfire Official Clarifications

Back in the days when there was no Crossfire Yahoo forum, and we shared a forum with the Spearhead guys, John Moher posted some Crossfire clarifications from Arty Conliffe. Tim M. hosted these clarifications until his site closed down a couple of years ago. I thought they are useful for the community so have reposted them here.

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Comparing IV 68 Medieval Spanish or Portuguese in DBA2.2 and DBA3.0

DBA3.0 Cover

I’m in the process of putting my Medieval Spanish or Portuguese onto Big Bases. since I want to use them for Big Base DBA I thought I’d have a look at the army list in DBA 3.0. Well, it is different to that is DBA2.2, so I thought I’d do a side by side comparison.

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Italian Wars – How did the Spanish colunela deploy in battle?

Detail from Siege of Alesia

In the first part of the Great Italian Wars, until the introduction of the Tercio in 1534, the Spanish were organised into columns (colunelas) under a Colonel. We have some idea of the theoretical organisation of the Spanish colunela, but how did the Spanish colunela deploy in battle? And what is the difference between a colunela and a coronelía? This is what I know.

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Welsh versus Picts – An Arthurian HOTT Battle Report

01 King Arthur advances on right

I recently transferred my Dark Age figures for Hordes of the Things (HOTT) to Big Bases. Magicians, beasts, clerics, hordes, that kind of thing, making Big Base HOTT. This included my Strathclyde Welsh (Northern Cymry) for Britannia 600 AD.

To celebrate the big basing, Chris Harrod and I had a game of Arthurian HOTT. Chris brought along his Picts and we used sabots to give him big bases.

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Ponyri Station – A Hit the Dirt Blast from the Past

Ponyri Station 12

I was filing old papers tonight when I found a few photos of a very early game of Crossfire. Real photos, you know, the ones on photographic paper, from a shop. It took a while but I figure the game was Ponyri Station. I thought I’d share because, aside from the fact these are the only photos I have of a game of my favourite scenario from Hit the Dirt, they also show how I started out in Crossfire – using anything I had.

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Fincher’s Initiative – A Crossfire Scenario for Vietnam

Map for Fincher's Initiative

Julian Davies sent over one of his Vietnam scenarios for the Schueler variant of Crossfire. All words are Julian’s.

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Small Threat to the Flank – A Crossfire Battle Report

STTTF01 Table

Chris Harrod and I played my Small Threat to the Flank Scenario. A good game although the map needs a bit of work.

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Who has the Bazooka? IDs for Infantry Anti-tank Weapons in Crossfire

Crossfire Stand IDs - F-2-3 RedDot

Who has the bazooka? The red dot guy of course. Very early on it was obvious we needed a way to distinguish stands with infantry anti-tank weapons in Crossfire. We use a red dot next to the unit ID, on the stand label.

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Where is the Fuel – A Crossfire Scenario and Battle Report

Fuel15 Sherman out-flanks Panzer IV

Brett Simpson developed an idea of a friend of mine into a Crossfire scenario called “Where is the Fuel?”. Brett sent through the scenario and associated battle report for the play test.

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