Category: North African Campaign


Swaab – Field of Fire: Diary of a Gunner Officer

Jack Swaab (2005) was a Gunner Officer with the 51st Highland Division from 3 Jan 1943 to the end of World War II. He fought in North Africa, Sicily, Italy, and NW Europe. His book is literally his personal diary. It is interesting to read to get an idea what was on the mind of a literate combat solider, although there are few detailed accounts of action.

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Order of Battle of 2 New Zealand Division

Order of battle for 2 New Zealand Division during WW2. The organisations are primarily based on Phillips (1957, p. 27), Doherty (1999), and Plowman, J. and Thomas, M. (2000, 2002). I have ignored HQ (unless it included armoured vehicles), transport, support, administration, and band elements.

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Crossfire For Novices – A Scenario to Introduce Newbies

Table Novice

If you’re completely new to the Arty Conliffe’s Crossfire then Nikolas Lloyd has a good Description and Review and some Advice on Play, and also check out Rob Wolsky Tactical Advice.

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National Attributes – Tactics and Command during WW2

Some notes I made as explanation of why in Crossfire different nationalities during WW2 have different ratings for Officers and for Command and Control. Most details taken from (Hastings, 1984)

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German Motorcycle Troops in WW2

Mentioned by John Moher on the Crossfire forum:

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Crossfire in the Western Desert

All my Crossfire so far has been European with the potential for lots of cover, but I’ve been musing on how to represent desert battles. I believe that it is possible to get a good game out in the desert, but it does require some thinking.

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Assault on Tobruk – A Crossfire Scenario

Table Tobruk

A Crossfire scenario based on the German assault on Tobruk. So far this is my only “desert” scenario.

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Spaniards in French Service During WW2

A lot of Spaniards fought in French Service in WW2. Both as complete units and as individuals. On the outbreak of WWII the French recruited heavily from Republican refugees of the recently ended Spanish Civil War. The choice for these men was remain in French internment camps or join the French army. During the course of the war these Republicans fought in most theatres, for example at Narvik, in the raid on Brest, with the Long Range Desert Group, Leclerc’s 2nd Armoured Division, the British SAS, and the French resistance. Spanish fought with the Free French Troops and in the

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How Light Tanks are Underrated by Wargames Rules

I was talking to my mate Roland Davis about Light Tanks in WW2 and this is what he said …

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Did Tanks Reverse in Combat during WW2?

Opinions are divided on whether tanks reversed during WW2. I’m particular interested because this has implications for Crossfire.

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Tank Firing Main Gun and Machine Guns

WW2 tanks typically had a main gun and one or more machine guns. How were they used in combination?

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References for Spanish Involvement in WW2

An annotated bibliography for Spanish Involvement in WW2.

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Spanish Involvement in World War II

Most people don’t realise that although officially neutral Spain had an active part in WW2 in the form of the Blue Division, otherwise known as the Spanish Volunteer Division, Division Azul, or by its official German title of the 250th Infantry Division of the Wehrmacht. Individual Spaniards were also involved on both sides during WWII, often in quite large numbers. In a few cases these individuals were collected into units.

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What Weapons When During WW2

I wanted to know when various weapons were introduced during WW2 so I could have scenarios that were vaguely historical in terms of equipment. I don’t promise that the below is totally correct, but it is the best I could come up with using the web.

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WW2 Facts, Tactics, Orders of Battle, etc

I’ve lumped all sorts of tidbits in here.

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