Unlimited Vehicle Movement – Revising Crossfire Anti-tank Rules 8

Musing - Revising the Crossfire Anti-tank Rules - Corssfire - Banner

My recent musing on the anti-tank rules in Crossfire got me thinking about my current rules on vehicle actions. CF11.1 Vehicular Actions is massively restrictive as it only gives vehicles the option to move or shoot. So I for 20 years I’ve been giving vehicles multiple move actions (1-3 depending on speed) and unlimited shooting. Both of these rules are contrary to the unlimited actions of infantry in standard Crossfire. It would be great to give vehicles unlimited actions, like the infantry. So I look at the rules that have come before then look at options for unlimited vehicle movement.

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Ningthoukhong Experiment – A Crossfire Battle Report

Ningthoukhong-104 Table from south-east - Banner

At 16.30 hours my raised roads for Burma arrived. Unpainted of course. By 20.00 hours they were painted and ready to play. My Japanese have been ready for a while and I recently based my new Gurkha battalion. It was three years ago when I got all keen and wrote up some notes and drew some maps for Bishenpur, Potsangbam and Ningthoukhong – Gurkhas on the Imphal Plain 1944. Finally we could play some Crossfire at Ningthoukhong.

Summary: In a tense game the Adam’s Japanese held the south of Ningthoukhong against a fierce attack by Chris’s Gurkhas.

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Leshnov 1941 – A Scenario for Martin Rapier’s One Hour WW2 (6 hit)

Leshnov 1941 - Table - Banner

I’m an avid follower of Martin Rapier’s blog The Games We Play and when looking at his history found his battle report of Leshnov 1941. The scenario has a long history originating with Grant (1981), then Thomas (2014), Rolph (2017) before Martin’s version. The scenario is for Martin Rapier’s One Hour WW2 (6 hit) (a variant of One Hour Wargames). Unfortunately, Martin’s version of the scenario is implicit in his description of the game. Hoping to to play it myself, I’ve tried to re-engineer the scenario from his description. Rapier notes that this scenario exercises all the main game mechanisms of his One Hour WW2 (6 hit) as it includes airpower, artillery, AT guns and all the major unit types including Heavy Tanks and recce.

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British Trucks for the 14th Army in Burma

Trucks-111 Bedford MWDs - Battlefield3D - Banner

I needed a British truck / lorry for my post on Improvising and making Japanese barricades for the Burma Campaign. So I ordered some 3D printed models from Battlefield3D. Before they arrived, and to my surprise, I found an undercoated Bedford MWD in my in progress project box, and some CMP 3-ton lorries in my British unpainted box. So I got to work. You can think of this post as the British extension to You can never have too many trucks.

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15mm Wargaming Figures for Chinese in WW2

Eureka - WW2 - Chinese - Big Sword, Riflemen, SMG, LMG - Banner

When British wargamers think of the Burma Campaign, we think the 14th Army. But the Chinese made an important contribution to the Allied effort in Burma. Eureka Miniatures have a Range of Chinese that covers the Second Sino-Japanese War which overlapped with WW2. I have a quick look at that range then explore other options if you, like me, want even more variety in your 15mm wargaming armies.

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15mm Wargaming Figures for the 14th Army

14Army-102 Inital figures - Banner

This post is for anybody interested in collecting 15mm wargaming figures to use for the 14th Army, which fought in the Burma Campaign of WW2. The figures will work for British, Indian or African units. At least those that wore either helmet or slouch hat. It won’t work for Gurkhas (except British officers/NCOs) because of their size. It will only work for Indians wearing turbans (e.g. Sikhs) and Scots wearing the tam o’ shanter during the earlier period.

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WW2 Painting Guide – Soviet Cossack Cavalry

Soviet Cossacks of WW2 - Banner

Okay, I’ve been obsessing about Cossacks in World War 2 lately, hence my post on Soviet Cavalry Regiments in Crossfire. So I went looking for 15mm Cossacks and found that the figures from Flames of War and from Peter Pig look totally different. I wanted to understand why and how to paint each appropriately. This post explains all about that and is a painting guide for both styles.

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Designing Modular Raised Roads sections for Burma

Raised Road 124 Examples - Banner

Following on the previous success of my custom crests version 2 and the high rice paddy bunds for Burma, I’m now thinking of a set of raised roads. Raised roads were a common feature of Burma. They’ll be the same height as the previous features (1/4″ / 6mm). Otherwise they’d be, well, just roads. I’m hoping to convince Simon from S&A Scenics to make the base features then I’ll do the work to make them look like roads. This post is about my design for the roads, which was a project in itself.

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Soviet Cavalry Regiment in Crossfire

Order of Battle - Crossfire - Banner

I’ve had a hankering to build a dismounted Cossack Cavalry Regiment for a while. For service on the Eastern Front of WW2. What has held me back was the lack of 15mm figures. Flames of War had a great set, but discontinued it. Luckily Peter Pig have brought a new Cossack range to market so now I have to figure out what I need for Crossfire.

Although there were Soviet Cavalry Divisions and Corps, the building block was the Cavalry Regiment. Zaloga and Ness (2003) describe the various TO&E for the Soviet Cavalry Regiments (p. 101-117). The regiment was about the size of an infantry battalion, so perfect for Crossfire. I’ve listed the Crossfire Orbat for the various Soviet Cavalry Regiments. Although Soviet cavalry could and did charge mounted, generally they fought dismounted and the order of battle acknowledges that.

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Japanese Roadblock – A Crossfire Experiment

roadblock-102 Table - Banner

With my Japanese all ready to go and my head full of roadblocks in Burma, I thought I’d knock together a Crossfire game. Chris took defending Japanese. Adam was the British trying to break through. I call this an experiment because very little thought went into it and we were just playing around with the concept of a Japanese ambush.

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Roadblock Battles on the Retreat from Burma

1942 - Burma - Burning vehicles on the side of the road - Banner

I’ve already posted about Japanese Roadblocks in Burma. Japanese strategy involved infiltrating whole regiments behind enemy lines then installing road-blocks to cut off the retreating Allies. So I went looking for examples of road-blocks during the period 14 December 1941 – 24 May 1942. To make my life easier, I’ve just copied out the extracts.

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Japanese Roadblocks in Burma

Handbook Figure 100. Japanese road block - Banner

Japanese roadblocks were a thing. During their initial invasion of Burma, Japanese strategy often involved infiltrating whole regiments behind enemy lines then installing roadblocks to cut off the retreating Allies. So I went looking for some source material. I found a couple of interesting war time articles by the Americans on Japanese roadblocks and some more about roadblocks in Burma. I’ll discuss why the Japanese were keen on roadblocks, the nature of the roadblocks themselves, the terrain selected for a roadblock, and typical defenders.

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Musing on Japanese house rules in Crossfire

Japanese-02 1st Company Banzai - Banner

My Japanese leg infantry battalion for Crossfire is now painted and based. All very exciting! The more I read about the Japanese, the more I realise they had a completely different mind set to western armies. I wonder how much of that difference should flow through into Crossfire. So I’ve looked at other rule sets to see how they have handled the Japanese in WW2 and, from that, possible implications for Crossfire.

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